Want to be a High Achiever in the veterinary industry? This is your opportunity

The on-line course How High Achievers Succeed and Keep Succeeding is starting again soon, over 6 weeks on Thursdays from October 17 to November 21, 2019.This course has run ten times so far with close to 100 people being a part of the small group format.

So why might you want to take some time out of your busy life to join the course?

Let’s go straight to the horses’ mouth to find the answer as this is a question that Cathy asks each participant in order to personalise the course to their needs. Detailed data analysis revealed 4 key themes in the vets, nurses, practice managers, and others that have attended.

 

Improving work-life balance.

Far and away the biggest reason for joining the course relates to improving work-life balance and building skills to achieve this improvement; better manage stress, burnout or life in general, dial down an overactive mind, grow self-awareness, set boundaries and have perspective. This is no surprise given that high workloads are relatively common in our industry and Australian research (Dinh et al 2017) identifies that productivity and mental health start to decline when we work more than 39 hours a week on average.

Exploring passion, purpose and career direction.

Others come on the course to think about what it is they love and don’t love about their work and how they might craft their jobs to create more enjoyment and satisfaction along with the sense that they are making a contribution to a better world. A drive to explore “where to next” makes sense when you consider that 19% of respondents to the 2018 AVA Workforce survey were considering not working as a veterinarian in a years time.

Growing self-confidence.

Low self-confidence coupled with high expectations of ourselves are common in the veterinary world and many people came to the course looking for (and finding) suggestions to manage this.  

Working well with others.

The people we encounter in the veterinary world, clients and colleagues alike, can challenge us. Sometimes they can feel like an obstacle getting in the way of us providing effective veterinary care. Course participants found that gaining greater understanding of themselves and their motivations, whilst also learning to better take the perspective of the other, was a beneficial outcome in their day to day lives.

 

 

Getting information that relates to these key themes is easy. The difficult part is finding the motivation and identifying and breaking down the barriers to behavioural change.

High Achievers have appreciated the safe space and dedicated time that the course creates that allows them to talk, and to reflect on their lives and their habits. They learn both from other people and their experiences, and the science of positive psychology, to personalise that learning and set step-by-step goals to improve their lives.

So what about you? How would you rate your current work-life satisfaction and enjoyment? If you are less than a 7/10, then now could be a good time to join the course!

OR – you might have completed a Mental Health First Aid course and want to play an active role in supporting the teams’ mental health within your practice. High Achievers provides a great summary of the literature on leading a fulfilling life which will be very helpful in your important role.

Either way, Cathy and VetPrac would love to see you in the course starting soon.

If you’d like to learn a little more about Cathy, and missed my articles about her over recent years, click here to find out about how she followed her passions which lead to her current role as Veterinary Well-Being Consultant and Coach.

 

Download the brochure for High Achievers or Click Here to Register.

Make Your Dreams A Reality

It’s been a while since I’ve written and I’d like to share. You see, I’ve been asleep for a little while, dreaming. And my dreams are coming true so it’s time to wake up and tell you about it.

I am privileged to be working with the best team I can imagine. Janine, Solange and Ros are superstars in their areas of expertise. The educators we have leading our workshops are the best in the world. Each one experienced, energetic, wise and generous to the hilt. The universities and facilities and training partners we work with are the best in the region with the newest demonstration equipment, best layouts and most capable technical support staff on hand to meet our very demanding needs.

 

I started VetPrac with a few goals in mind:

1. To give Australian vets the best quality post-graduate vocational education in the world
2. To meet and work with amazing people who inspire and achieve beyond expectation.
3. To inspire Australian vets to do better for ourselves and our patients so we can feel better about ourselves and happier in general
4. To run an effective business
5. To connect people and reduce the feeling of isolation in our community

VetPrac has achieved this and much more. Testimonials of kind compliments fill our feedback forms. Other organizations have tried to copy our programs. Many of our workshops fill even before they are open for registration, because the expressions of interest are so strong and people want the best for themselves and their patients, and we can provide it. We have opened doors to possibilities which when I started, people told me weren’t possible. They told me I was dreaming. And they were right. General Practice vets could be better equipped to meet the needs of their patients and clients and now we are.

A good friend, who recently overcame great challenges, told me many moons ago “If you really want something, the universe will conspire to assist you”. It’s taken me over 15yrs to understand that, but I do now.

Things rarely happen in the order or the way we want them to. But they do happen. Don’t give up on your dreams and thank people who tell you that you are dreaming… Because dreams come true when you wake up and find ways to realise them.

 

To tap into our plans for 2020 CLICK HERE

 

The only one left with places in 2019 is the “How High Achievers Succeed and Keep Succeeding Workshop” With Cathy Warburton online. Only 5 places left.

Warmest Wishes,

Ilana

 

Ashlee’s journey: Nursing to Canine Rehabilitation Certification

Looking for a new challenge in your career as a veterinary nurse or technician?

Have you considered the field of canine sports medicine and rehabilitation?

Read on to find out how Ashlee Callander chose this career path. Ashlee is now a senior CCRA (Certified Canine Rehabilitation Assistant) at the Vet Practice in Whittlesea, Victoria, and will join the education team at VetPrac for the Canine Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation Workshop later this month.


How did you first develop an interest in canine sports medicine and rehabilitation?

“I have always had a passion for animals; originally coming from the hairdressing and beauty industry I was looking for something more fulfilling. Being a CCRA gives me the ability to have such a great impact on the animal’s physical state and well-being. I also love educating clients on providing a higher level of care to their furry family members and being able to provide support to them even in the harder times. Rehab isn’t just a job; it takes an immense level of dedication and care to ensure only the best for our animals.”

 

Tell us about the training you’ve undergone to become a certified canine rehab assistant.

“My clinic always sees the importance of having educated and accredited staff to provide knowledgeable and correct treatment. My studies have allowed me to spend some amazing time over in the US; I made 2 trips over to complete my certification and placement. During this time, I met some of the kindest, compassionate and amazingly skilled human beings. It is such a great feeling to meet so many people with such dedication to the field and to the quality of our dog’s lives.”

 

What kind of clinic do you work in?

“I work in one of the largest clinics in Australia; we are a 24hr animal hospital that provides everything from basic care to state-of-the-art treatments. These services include CT, MRI, orthopaedic surgery, regenerative medicine and of course our fully certified rehab centre that is currently 6 members strong and growing.”

 

What’s a typical day at your clinic in your role as a rehab assistant?

“Every day is different when it comes to my job! I work with a combination of inpatient post ortho or neuro patients, outpatient post ortho/sporting/geriatric/neuro who come in for a session with their owner and what we call All Day Rehab patients that come and stay with us for the day. Every day is a different balance of each, but there is always a guarantee that it’s going to be a busy day!”

 

What strengths do you bring to your team?

“I love getting creative with our patients’ rehab to be able to get the most out of their exercises. I’m also big on form and ensuring correct posture and gait; it’s not just as simple as getting dogs to do cool tricks. It’s great when our team brainstorms and adds all of our knowledge together, especially when working with a hard case.”

 

What advice do you have for veterinary nurses or technicians that wish to pursue a career in canine rehabilitation?

“It is such a fulfilling career and I love what I do. Ensure that you practice your skills every day and get hands-on every chance you can in your training as good palpation skills are key. You also need to be prepared for the emotional rollercoaster that comes with it. Ensure you and your team support each other physically and emotionally.”

 

When asked about a memorable case she’d been involved with Ashlee replied “It’s hard for me to describe one case that is really memorable for me as on a regular basis we see patients that have been given euthanasia as their best option: the incurable lameness that’s been going on for months if not years or the paralysed dog that no one thinks will walk again. We have been able to prove all these things wrong and significantly turn their lives around and regain an active quality of life. It takes dedication from our team and the owners to nurse these patients back to health. It’s pretty special!”

 

What do you like to do for fun?

“In my winddown time, I love getting out into the fresh air and exploring our beautiful countryside, including doing this on horseback. I have 1 dog, 1 cat, and 3 horses so a lot of my time outside of work is dedicated to them. They are my sanity!”

 

Ashlee Callander can be contacted at The Vet Practice on (03) 9716 2495 or ashlee.callander@thevetpractice.com.au
https://www.thevetpractice.com.au/

To find out more about the training required to become a certified canine rehabilitation veterinary nurse, go to http://www.caninerehabinstitute.com/CCRVN.html

Dr. Kim Lim inspires with her passion for Canine Rehabilitation

If you’re one of the lucky people that has registered for the Canine Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation Workshop, you’ll meet Dr Kim Lim, who is an educator at the workshop. When I interviewed Kim recently, I was blown away by her passion for veterinary rehabilitation. If Kim can’t demonstrate the benefits of rehabilitation, then I don’t think anyone could!

Read on to learn more about Kim and her inspiring career in rehabilitation.


 

What inspired you to become a veterinarian and then go onto specialise in canine rehabilitation?

“I chose to be a vet by default; looking at a list of university courses in year 9, I had no idea what most of them were. Top of the list was actuary(?) Anyway at the bottom was veterinary science and I knew what that was. Maybe it was a bit of guilt from my rabbit having to be put down with myxo. Luckily for me, I have never regretted it. I loved pulling things apart and trying (mostly unsuccessfully) to put things back together again when young. Surgery was quite similar, but I didn’t enjoy the anaesthetic side of things (back then, I started with an in-breathing Komesaroff, no other monitoring devices etc.).

Discovering biomechanical medicine allowed me to change the biomechanics and function of the body without the anaesthetic or cutting things open. Rehabilitation was a natural extension of the biomechanics training. Sometimes it is like finding pieces of the jigsaw puzzle; you keep looking for better, more elegant ways to help your patients. I remember graduating from vet school and feeling like I never wanted to study again.

So, I did an acupuncture certification a year later because that wasn’t anything like vet school studying. It was more like the stuff my mother used to tell me; a bit of my culture thrown in, not really medicine…How wrong I was; and I have never really stopped learning since.”

 

What would you have done if you hadn’t become a veterinarian?

“Probably an engineer. There is a long history of engineers in the family. I have since found out that my love of fixing things is not just an engineering thing but is shared among many vets.”

 

In your own words, what is it about canine rehabilitation that you find interesting and that you believe general practitioners would benefit from learning about and performing better?

“I first discovered the importance of rehabilitation when a patient was presented to me four weeks after cruciate surgery. I asked the owner what she had been doing since the surgery and she told me she had been walking to the letterbox and back. When asked what else she had been doing, she replied, that’s it. That’s all the surgeon said the dog was allowed to do. I think this was the moment in 2011 when I realised I had a mission to educate my fellow veterinarians out there that just like in human medicine where they get you out of bed the day after surgery and on to a rehabilitation programme, it is not correct to cage rest or severely limit mobility of a dog after a similar type of surgery for six weeks. Another classic example is of the cruciate repair where the surgeon is happy with the surgery, healing rate etc. but the dog’s gait and posture are terrible; hind legs tucked under, kyphotic stance and no engagement and no strength from behind. Changing the biomechanics and adding rehabilitation to engage the hamstrings and release the psoas and the patient can then reap the benefits of the cruciate surgery.”

 

Read Dr. Lim’s article published in Vet Practice Magazine (May, 2019)

 

What procedure, technology, or medication have you used for a dog post-surgery or musculoskeletal injury, and realised that there was a better alternative?

“There is a common misconception that integrative/ alternative/ complementary medicine veterinarians have 2 heads or a chip on their shoulder or are just plain weird. The truth is that many of us started out wanting to be a mixed practice vet like James Herriot. However, there were things that our university taught tools were inadequate for and we kept searching for answers… The first was a Beagle more than 25 years ago. The owner reported that the dog screamed at home. On examination we poked, prodded, pulled the body all ways and got nothing. We took multiple radiographs and got nothing. NSAIDs etc. did nothing. This went on for multiple visits. Then, the owners rang and said they had taken their dog to the veterinary chiropractor down the road, Dr Alex Hauler and the dog was all better now. Apparently, it had been in the neck. A few years later, it was a German Shepherd with a sore back. I treated it with some acupuncture; he was also getting treatment at his local vet, but his back was still sore. At that time, there was a Control and Therapy article (CVE), again by Dr Alex Hauler describing the chiropractic treatment of a German Shepherd that was almost identical to the dog I was treating. It was so frustrating not having the diagnostic or biomechanical medicine skills to help this patient. A month later, I was at a Sydney Postgraduate course on endocrinology (now CVE) and Dr Doug Bryden mentioned that the very first university offered animal chiropractic course was starting at RMIT. The rest is history…”

 

What is the most memorable case you’ve been involved with, that resulted in dramatic improvement to the animal’s quality of life?

“I used to have a miracle a year and now I have lost count. They are not really miracles if you see the same improvement consistently over many years with many patients. There was the 14-year-old Doberman cross that did a disc in his neck and became a quadriplegic; his owner bought a stretcher and brought him in to see me. This dog got better, eventually was able to walk up the mountain/ hill behind his house and died 2 years later of some neoplasia. Another memorable one was a dog that got run over by a 4WD; he was going to die, then he was going to lose his leg… he ended up surviving; was brought in for acupuncture, biomechanical treatment and rehabilitation and after a course of treatment was back chasing the same 4WD. Some of them never learn.

At the moment, I am treating an acute polyradiculoneuritis that was presented to me 7 months after the diagnosis was made. This little dog could only move his head, not his legs…His owner had given up his job to care for his mate. He drove 3 hours to come to me when he found my website. This dog was in a bad way; there had been no useful rehabilitation or therapy for the last 7 months. I was not hopeful. Two weeks later at the second consultation, the dog is now crab crawling with his front legs and able to make weak paddling movements with his back legs; the tail is going 19 to a dozen. There are still no promises, but this is one reason why I do what I do.”

 

Do you have any pets?

“2 cats; a ginger and a tuxedo. The ginger’s wish in life is to be an only child- all about him 24/7. The kids have grown up and left home but there’s still one that needs his mum ALL the time. 5 bantam chickens that are the ultimate freeloaders- too fat to lay properly because they have steadily eaten their way through my orchard for the last 12 months.”

 

What do you like to do for fun?

“I am not a great believer in fun. This doesn’t mean I am miserable but rather that I feel most complete when I am useful to someone or something else. So apart from my paid job helping pets, I have volunteered my time with my children’s schools for many years and then moved on to be a venturer scout leader (still stuck with teenagers; how do high school teachers do it?). I am also involved in the Australian Veterinary Acupuncture Group, the Animal Biomechanical Professionals Association (ABPA) and the teaching of the Graduate Diploma in Animal Biomechanical Medicine. I have come to realise that I am happiest when mildly stressed! My mission in life is to leave the world knowing and hoping that I have made a difference. In my ‘spare time’ I love working in my garden, commuting from A to B by bike or public transport and visiting the local library.”

 

Kim can be contacted at 0478131646 or geelongcreatures@gmail.com
Website: geelongcreatures.com.au

 

At the time of print, there was one spot left in this workshop to be run from August 30 – September 1, 2019. I’m guessing this spot will be snapped up by someone who reads Kim’s down to earth interview responses and is inspired to learn more about the rewarding field of canine rehabilitation!

 

Download the Brochure for this workshop or Register Now for the final spot.

 

 

Introverts can Exude Confidence too! Here’s how

Let’s face it, many of us are introverts. Many of us find people who are overly confident as imposing. But the moment we enter a room, people are immediately forming an impression. They’re making snap judgments and perceptions based on how we carry ourselves and how we interact with others. This applies to everyone in any situation from welcoming clients, family functions to networking events, staff meetings, initial consultations, or greeting pet owners at reception. It also occurs internally when you start a new job or enter the business for each shift or team meeting.

Regardless of the situation, people are less inclined to give you attention and respect if you appear uncomfortable or insecure. Within seconds your lack of confidence will discredit your presence and any information you’re about to deliver. No one needs that… what we do is hard enough without adding to it. But it’s a truth.

Body language is an integral part of communication and the way you present yourself is more paramount to a successful outcome than you likely realise.

Here are three tips to appear confident.

Inside Out/Outside In:

 

Some people think you can earn respect by presenting yourself as physically confident. Some people think confidence comes from within. In my experience, both work.

On days when I want to impress, I put on my nicest underwear, smartest outfits and shine my shoes. All actors talk about how they create their characters. Even if you aren’t naturally confident, if you dress the part it will influence your capacity to deliver.

Inside we are all a little bit shy, it’s normal as a social species to be apprehensive in this way. “Will this person/tribe accept me?” is a basic social query. At a reptilian level, the fear is that if they don’t accept me there will be conflict or worse…death. It takes our higher brain to reassure us that approaching strangers or people who we are not close to will not have adverse effects on our basic safety and security.

It seems ridiculous that sometimes we have to talk to ourselves this way, but if we dig underneath our fears – what we usually find is a juvenile belief about security that has been ignored. So reach deep, soothe quickly by reminding yourself that you have a lot to offer and people want to know what that is. You are special and important. Even if you aren’t Einstein or Hussein Bolt you have something to contribute, you might just need to grow into yourself.

 

Everyone else wants confidence too:

 

Inside we are all a little bit shy. And the other people we meet usually want to impress and be accepted too. Knowing this can help reduce any anxiety or challenges we have trying to reach them. Suddenly, people in the room aren’t intimidating enemies you have to get through to. They are willing participants in the game of social cooperation. And that’s a beautiful idea that opens up possibilities in communication. I try to remember that, especially when someone is defensive. There is always a way to connect. You just have to find it.

 

Eye contact is everything:

 

If communication is about conveying messages that facilitate understanding of ideas, then eye contact is a key to that process. There’s a lot of good science around the neural processing that takes place through our optic system. When we look into another person’s eyes we experience limbic resonance. This is described by the researchers who first wrote about it as “a symphony of mutual and internal adaptation whereby two mammals become attuned to each other’s inner states.” And “the door to communal connection.” The practical implication of this information is that by learning to monitor our own emotions and sense emotional changes in other people, it becomes possible to recognize what people are feeling; and, by learning to navigate and manage our own emotions, we influence the emotions of others. It’s the key to using info in my first two points. When you look confident and project confidence it can be infectious and effective at navigating positive outcome.

 

If you’d like coaching and guidance about achieving these tips in any situation, VetPrac can help. We have online workshops facilitated by respected veterinarians to help you advance your skills beyond the technical expertise.

Join Dr. Sandra Nguyen’s Vet Talk workshop every Tuesday night for 7 weeks to enhance your communication skills not only with clients but your colleagues too. This online classroom kicks off on July 23rd and covers 7 units encompassing everything from understanding the client, to delivering bad news, communication with the health care team, and so much more.

Further to this, Dr. Cathy Warburton is also facilitating How High Achievers Succeed and Keep Succeeding every Thursday night for 6 weeks. This workshop commencing on October 17th spans 6 weeks with resources to develop good habits and scientific evidence about the links between well-being and success. If you’ve ever looked at your colleagues with respect and thought, “I want to do that too!” this is your opportunity to kick things off.

     

 

If you’ve ever walked into a function or consultation room, and felt you didn’t have the skills to impress – both of these workshops are exactly what you need to build your confidence and excel in your career.

Visit the VetPrac website for more details about these opportunities. The online class sizes are limited to 10 to ensure you receive the best experience possible with the personalised attention VetPrac prides itself on. Registrations are open to veterinarians, nurses, administration, support staff, and management.

Your First Step Toward Owning Your Own Practice

The economy is slow… It’s a GREAT time to buy a business.

They always say, “Listen to your mother.” My mother is a pretty clever lady and she once told me that the best time to buy into a business is when the economy is slow. Given the current RBA cash rate of 1%, I can’t remember a time when the economy has been so slow which is definitely good news for buyers.

Many of us never consider purchasing a business. Practice ownership is fraught with the difficulty of personnel management, financial responsibility, and equipment maintenance. But to the lucky few who like the variety of life being a business owner can throw at you – the rewards can be brilliant.

Aside from financial gain, you get to shape a mini-world into a utopian environment with your value system.

If you want to work and operate in a place where people care about each other then, as the boss, you can make that a priority.

If you want to charge lots of money and not compromise on the gold-standard. You can.

If you want to make allowances to those in need and supplement their deficiencies with your generosity. You can because you’re the boss.

Most people know that the veterinary market is relatively stable. We don’t make huge profits on our businesses, but unlike the finance or property sectors, there is significant buoyancy and sustained commitment of our customer base which makes it a good investment. This is why it’s an appealing option for the large equity firms looking to leverage their money. Why not take a leaf out of their book and invest yourself?

It is true that business is hard. And many businesses fall down because of a number of issues that can plague them. But if you never try, how will you know if you could be successful as a business owner too?

Business is not like the life and death world of veterinary practice. Yes, a lot rides on it, but I think the perspective we have in facing real life and death decisions can give us a great deal of strength in business.

As Sheryl Sandberg COO of Facebook said, “When life sucks you under, you can kick against the bottom to rise up, find the surface and breathe again.”

I love owning a business and one day I hope to own a vet practice too.

If you’ve ever wanted to create your own utopia, consider joining us in Sydney in November to learn how to start.

EXIT STRATEGIES FOR VET BUSINESS OWNERS
Your business is important so spend the day with us to find out how the processes in exit strategies work from industry professionals.
Download the brochure or Click here to register

 

HOW TO BUY A VETERINARY BUSINESS
Do you want the responsibilities and rewards of business ownership but not sure where to start? Join us for a day of expert advice to get you started.
Download the brochure or Click here to register

 

 

Can’t Fix the Lameness? The importance of Post-Op Rehab for Canine Patients

Why won’t the dog put its leg down? The radiograph shows that surgery went well. Does this sound familiar? Have you see this after your cruciate or patella surgery?

The importance of post-operative rehabilitation and rehabilitation to complement the pain management plan for your old arthritic dogs cannot be ignored.

Rehabilitation and physical therapy should be a valuable service that you can offer your patients. Post-operatively, healing can be optimized and accelerated if collagen fibres are encouraged to heal to maximize strength. Compensations in associated muscles, soft tissue and associated joints can be addressed. Any restrictions is similar to having your brakes half on while trying to accelerate at the same time.

It is all too common for our non-steroidal anti-inflammatories to be less effective over time. Have you ever wondered why? Do you just switch to another pain killer or increase the dose? The cause could actually be as simple as poor delivery to the intended site due to a compromise in local circulation. Tight muscles and inactivity reduce perfusion. Properly managed physical therapy and rehabilitation can reverse this.

The old saying, “Use it or lost it” is a wise saying. It is no longer acceptable to cage rest for six weeks after cruciate surgery. Human patients are up and about the day after their knee replacements and they want the same for their pets.

 

Dr Kim Lim BVsc (Hons), Cert Vet Ac (IVAS), M Chiro (RMIT)
Educator for Canine Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation
Hosted by VetPrac  |  Aug 30 – Sep 1st 2019 |  Connect with Dr Lim on LinkedIn

 

Join Dr Kim Lim by registering now for one of the final remaining positions in this 3-day practical workshop. More details are available by downloading our brochure.

 

This article proudly features in May 2019 issue of Vet Practice Magazine.

 

Ultrasound – A Sound ROI for Equine Vets

Don’t you wish you had a machine in your practice that printed money? Well – you do!

An Ultrasound machine used on every equine lameness case will increase the cash flow of your business by $150-600 per case depending on how you decide to price it.

If you do 4 call-outs per day you’ll earn an extra $600-$2400 per day. Which means, if you perform 20 lameness exams per week, you have the potential to make an extra $10,000 per week – just by using what you already have in the practice… Ultrasound! There’s also the added information you’ll have available to you from the diagnostics. It’s a win-win situation.

Let’s take a more conservative approach of 10 lameness exams per fortnight. This can still equate to an extra $2500 per week you were not earning before. Of course, this is conservative but imaging if your practice was seeing a high caseload of lameness exams with 10 scans a day?!… Wouldn’t that be dreamy?

Why would someone charge $150 for the scan when another person would charge $600? It’s a bit like tooth extractions. Here are three reasons:

 

Firstly – How do you value yourself as a professional service provider?
Do you have the skills to use your money maker and are those skills at a novice level? Or have you practiced them with a specialist under controlled conditions so you are confident they are strong, efficient and diagnostic?

 

Secondly – What are you scanning?
We all know there are laypersons out there offering all sorts of services. Anyone can buy an ultrasound machine and make it work for them. The machine might be good or not. They might have the skills, they might not. It’s an annoying reality of animal care these days. Lots of people spruiking without acceptable credentials. However, very few people have the training to scan accurately, to achieve better diagnostic results. But you can. You are a vet. You have the greatest and broadest capacity to give the best results for horse owners. Don’t doubt yourself. Others may know how to perform a direct perpendicular scan of the Suspensory Ligament. But they will not know what they are looking at with an oblique approach. They probably won’t scan the whole structure either. Nor would they have the background knowledge in anatomy and physiology which vets have to make good clinical judgments and provide prognostic and treatment advice for recovery. Others certainly don’t have the medical knowledge either. And those vet skills and techniques are worth charging for. But you can’t use all those skills if you haven’t got good diagnostics. And it’s well known that ultrasound, when applied properly, can give almost good results as MRI in a lot of common cases, AND it requires less anaesthesia and stuffing around (transport) of the patient. That’s worth paying for. Ultrasound is also a great monitoring tool for healing and can be used on repeat consultations to immediately judge the progress of a patient.
On top of that – Scanning a spine or Shoulder or Hip or even parts of the foot is a bucket load harder than scanning the superficial digital flexor tendon. So those anatomical differences might carry a loading fee to accommodate the time and skills required.

 

Thirdly – Do you have clientele and live in a demographic where price matters?
Realistically some of us can make bigger margins on our services because the demographics of our market allows for it.

 

So if you have an ultrasound machine sitting in your hospital and you aren’t using it on every lameness case you might be selling yourself short. Don’t sell yourself short! VetPrac has organised the worlds best lameness ultrasound workshop for equine practitioners this year on July 4-5 and 6-7th.

Register HERE for ‘Distal Limbs‘ July 4-5.

Register HERE for  ‘Proximal Limbs and Spine‘ July 6-7.

CLICK HERE to download the brochure about these workshops.

 

This article has kindly been written by our friends at

 

Proudly supported by:

Dr Alex Young – From UC Davis to the University of Queensland

Dr. Alex Young always imagined she’d be a horse vet. What started as a large animal ultrasound fellowship at UC Davis to hone her skills as a lameness diagnostician ended up in a specialist radiology qualification. It was the “exposure” to many different imaging modalities at UC Davis that morphed Alex from an equine vet into a specialist radiologist. Let’s hear more about Alex’s career and her passion for education.


What inspired you to become a veterinarian and then go onto specialise in radiology, in particular equine musculoskeletal imaging?
“My family owned a small thoroughbred breeding business when I was young and I always wanted to work with horses. At vet school, I was convinced that if I wasn’t a horse vet, I wouldn’t be a vet at all. I wanted to be out on the road, in my truck looking at horses in the fresh air and sunshine…these days I sit in a dark room and sometimes look at cat/dog radiographs thinking “How did this happen??” I never planned to become a radiologist. I liked lameness workups and began the UC Davis Large Animal ultrasound fellowship thinking that it would round out my capabilities as a lameness diagnostician…but with the exposure I received to all the other imaging modalities while I was there I couldn’t help but become interested in those also.”

Who were the biggest influences in your training at UC Davis?
“Dr. Sarah Puchalski, Dr. Mary Beth Whitcom and Dr. Mathieu Spriet”

Any advice for new grads or general practitioners that wish to pursue further education in the use of ultrasound for lameness assessments?
“There are some great ultrasound workshops around and the EVA generally has an imaging person presenting at the Bain Fallon conference every couple of years. Try to keep an eye out for these as there are often associated wet labs that offer great hands on experience.”

What have you learned from experience that you didn’t learn from a textbook?
“Ultrasound is all about practice and hands on repetition. The more you scan, the more you develop your hand-eye coordination and the more skilled an ultra sonographer you become. The more you see, the more you realise the mistakes you have made in the past and the better diagnostician you become.”

What do you enjoy about teaching?
“I really enjoy contributing to what I believe is a lingering deficit in our equine veterinary training. Most equine vets were never taught how to operate an ultrasound machine let alone place a transducer on a horse in vet school so there is a huge population of “self taught” vets doing their best but also feeling quite lost with this modality (I was one of these vets before I went overseas!) I enjoy helping my colleagues fill this deficit and sharing the skills and knowledge I gained in the USA.”

What do you like to do in your spare time?
“Spare time? What is that? I’m embarrassed to admit that prior to having kids, most of my life was my work. Now I’m loving being a mum and spending time with my family. My work might keep me in a dark room but family time is spent outdoors in the fresh air as much as possible!”

 

 

 

If you’re one of the many vets that feel lost with using ultrasound in lameness assessments of horses, why not register for the Equine Lameness Ultrasound workshop with Dr. Denoix at Gatton on July 4-7, 2019.  At this workshop, you’ll also meet Alex and have an opportunity to share much of her vast knowledge of all things imaging.

Download the brochure HERE.

Register HERE for Distal Limbs on July 4-5th 2019.

Register HERE for Proximal Limbs and Spine on July 6-7th 2019.

Video: CRI Canine Sports Medicine Course

Canine Rehabilitation Institute (CRI) is coming back to Australia!

Join us at the Canine Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation workshop. This is your opportunity to learn from the world’s best. Enrolments are open to Veterinarians, Physiotherapists and Vet nurses who work with a veterinarian certified in canine rehabilitation in their practice.

Canine Sports Medicine & Rehabilitation, 30th August – 1st September, 2019
This 3-day workshop contributes to the CCRT program. You can find out more by downloading the brochure on this link. This workshop will fill quickly so register now to avoid missing out.