Vet Education Online Veterinary Conference 2019

Advance your clinical decision-making and take your diagnostic skills to the next level from your couch! Join Vet Education for 2 weeks of LIVE online lectures and expert Q&As delivered by renowned specialists and speakers from around the world.

Topics include medicine, surgery, dentistry, behaviour, anaesthesia and more at the Vet Education Online Veterinary Conference 2019

You can participate live from your couch or afterwards when you have a spare moment to grab a beverage to unwind. Every lecture includes comprehensive notes and video recordings you can watch any time from your webinar library. Join in this digital conference and tell your colleagues about this extraordinary opportunity.

 

     

 

From July 22 – August 1, 2019 – this is an event like no other featuring a virtual conference center, virtual exhibition hall, 16 webinars, a webinar library and so, so much more! You can attend the online live lectures or watch the recording later from your own Vet Education Webinar Library!

 

VetPrac are proud to be supporters of this extraordinary conference
and we recommend you Register Now and lock it in to your calendar.

 

 

 

Proudly supported by:

 

 

 

VetPrac has upcoming practical workshops with limited spots remaining. Register now to avoid missing out!

 

   

 

We’re very proud to support the Vet Education Online Veterinary Conference 2019

What do you want to learn in 2020? Here’s a sneak peek of what’s to come!

We are opening up expressions of interest for the following workshops with dates to be announced later in the year.

VetPrac is a leader in practical skills education for the veterinary community in Australasia. We pride ourselves on innovative educational opportunities for the veterinary community striving to build confidence and competence. With our high-quality training resources and access to ground-breaking technologies, we are passionate about helping the veterinary profession grow and prosper.

 

Enter your details to receive early bird announcements when registrations officially open:

 

 

 

I think this course has transformed my consulting as it has taught me so much about lameness workups that I never learned at Uni or in practice! It has renewed my excitement about veterinary practice (having been in practice for 20 years).
~Anon, Canine Sports Medicine Workshop (September 2019)

 

An excellent workshop. I enjoyed this workshop very much. Stimulating, interesting and challenging. So many take-home points and has re-ignited my passion for ultrasound and diagnosis. Thank you Prof. Denoix and VetPrac.
~Dr Kelly Barrington, Equine Lameness & Ultrasound Workshop (July 2019)

 

These courses continue to exceed my expectations. They are simply awesome! The ratio of tutors to participants is perfect with friendly, practical, knowledgeable and great tutors. The facilities are fantastic and the social interaction and environment great.”  ~Malcolm Anderson, Fiddly Fractures Workshop (February 2019)

 

Check out our current workshops for 2019!

 

 

Can’t Fix the Lameness? The importance of Post-Op Rehab for Canine Patients

Why won’t the dog put its leg down? The radiograph shows that surgery went well. Does this sound familiar? Have you see this after your cruciate or patella surgery?

The importance of post-operative rehabilitation and rehabilitation to complement the pain management plan for your old arthritic dogs cannot be ignored.

Rehabilitation and physical therapy should be a valuable service that you can offer your patients. Post-operatively, healing can be optimized and accelerated if collagen fibres are encouraged to heal to maximize strength. Compensations in associated muscles, soft tissue and associated joints can be addressed. Any restrictions is similar to having your brakes half on while trying to accelerate at the same time.

It is all too common for our non-steroidal anti-inflammatories to be less effective over time. Have you ever wondered why? Do you just switch to another pain killer or increase the dose? The cause could actually be as simple as poor delivery to the intended site due to a compromise in local circulation. Tight muscles and inactivity reduce perfusion. Properly managed physical therapy and rehabilitation can reverse this.

The old saying, “Use it or lost it” is a wise saying. It is no longer acceptable to cage rest for six weeks after cruciate surgery. Human patients are up and about the day after their knee replacements and they want the same for their pets.

 

Dr Kim Lim BVsc (Hons), Cert Vet Ac (IVAS), M Chiro (RMIT)
Educator for Canine Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation
Hosted by VetPrac  |  Aug 30 – Sep 1st 2019 |  Connect with Dr Lim on LinkedIn

 

Join Dr Kim Lim by registering now for one of the final remaining positions in this 3-day practical workshop. More details are available by downloading our brochure.

 

This article proudly features in May 2019 issue of Vet Practice Magazine.

 

Vet Tips for TPLO Surgery

TIP 1. Did you know that TPLO can be performed in small breed dogs and cats?

If your client asks, “What is the best technique for my miniature poodle’s CCL rupture?” you can say TPLO with confidence. Our Vet Prac instructors routinely perform TPLO on small breed dogs and cats with excellent results. In fact, we feel that small breed dogs and cats recover faster and with better function following TPLO than extracapsular techniques.

TIP 2. TPLO has been shown to allow for healing of partial CCL tears.

Dr. Beale is one of the coauthors on a paper (Hulse et al., Vet Surg 2010) where second look arthroscopy was performed on dogs that had TPLO for partial CCL tears. Reevaluation found that partial CCL tears are protected and can heal when we perform TPLO before the CCL completely ruptures.

TIP 3. TPLO is a very versatile technique.

TPLO can be performed on animals from very small dogs with 1.5mm screws, and has been performed on a young male alpaca! It can be used in cases of medial patella luxation and excessive tibial plateau slope. The technique is very stable due to its biomechanics and more so with modern locking plate technology. There is a very low major complication rate (3.1%). And, once the tibia is healed, the implants can be easily removed (but is rarely required), without decreasing the efficacy or stability of the repair.